Hate Crime 

A Hate Crime or Incident is when a person, group or community are targeted because of hostility or prejudice towards their:

  • Disability
  • race or ethnicity
  • religion or belief
  • sexual orientation
  • transgender identity

There are various ways to report a hate crime or incident, which can be found on the Shropshire Council ‘Report a Hate Crime’ webpage.

If the person who is being targeted is an adult with care and support needs, the behaviour towards the person is abuse (please see our ‘About Abuse’ pages). Hate Crimes and Incidents should therefore also be considered as a safeguarding concern.

If you are the person who is being targeted; a family member or carer or a concerned member of the public, please do not hesitate to call Shropshire Council First Point of Contact: 0345 678 9044 or West Mercia Police: 101 (only use 999 when you are sure someone is in danger now).

If you are a professional or volunteer working with a person who is being targeted, please also refer to our Safeguarding Process in Shropshire on our Multi-Agency Procedures pages before raising a safeguarding concern.

For more information and resources on hate crime (including disability hate crime and mate crime), please refer to the related links and documents on this page.

 

Mate Crime

Mate crime happens when someone says they are your friend, but they do things that take advantage of you, including asking you for money a lot. A real friend does not need to be bought, and someone who takes your money or possessions and asks you to pay for lots of things, or makes you feel uncomfortable is not a true friend. If someone who says they are your friend hurts you, steals from you or makes you do something you don’t want to do, you should tell to someone you trust right away (Mencap, 2019).

Mate Crime does not always start with bullying but it can become bullying later on, it usually starts with people saying they are your friend or acting like they are (ARC, 2013). Mate crime is a hidden issue and happens behind closed doors in your home, the person taking advantage of you could be a ‘friend’ someone you know, a family member or someone that helps you (Bristol SAB, 2018).  

References:

Bristol Safeguarding Adults Board (2018) Mate Crime. Bristol: Bristol Safeguarding Adults Board. https://bristolsafeguarding.org/adults/public-families-and-carers/#MateCrime

Mencap (2019) Mate and hate crime. London: Mencap. https://www.mencap.org.uk/advice-and-support/bullying/mate-and-hate-crime  

The Association for Real Change (ARC) (2012) Safety Net Friend or Fake? An Easy Read Guidance Booklet about Hate Crime and Mate Crime. Chesterfield: ARC. https://arcuk.org.uk/safetynet/friend-or-fake-easy-read-booklet/